Viewing entries tagged
Advertising

Moving Pictures - Unlock the ROI Of Online Video

Comment

Moving Pictures - Unlock the ROI Of Online Video

Usage of online video continues to grow at a significant rate and has now become a key pillar in many marketing strategies.

  • Video accounted for 64 percent of all consumer Internet traffic in 2014
  • Videos on Facebook now receive over four billion views per day - helped significantly by Facebook’s auto-play settings!
  • PwC anticipates that video will be the fastest growing area of Internet advertising in Australia, tripling in value in the next 4 years
  • Nearly 1 in 3 millennials confirmed they have purchased a product as a direct result of watching a tutorial or how-to video about it

Organisations are investing a great deal in their video content strategies and are using the medium as a powerful and engaging tool to communicate brand and product concepts.

One key aspect that has historically been overlooked is driving action from video content. A number of brands are leveraging shoppable videos that highlight design trends via a brand ambassador or stylist to discuss what’s hot. Shoppable video then makes it easy for customers to find the full product details and purchase online. The critical factor is to deliver engaging content that showcases products whilst intertwining a story that compliments the viewing experience.

Leading examples of mixing video content and action include Burberry’s runway video which is an elegant example of melding new fashion looks with shopping abilty; Kate Spade with their beautifully executed campaign featuring Anna Kendrick - The Waiting Game and Joyus who use this technique for nearly all of their products online.

Video can be a very effective medium to communicate difficult concepts online such as size and scale of products, demonstrate features and benefits for complex products, address issues that may arise post sale and provide product tutorials.

Ultimately, video content is great at communicating engaging and emotive concepts and should be used to bring your brand alive.

Keen to learn more? Come along to my Online Retailer Conference session - Moving Pictures: Unlock the ROI Gold in Online Video on 22 July where I’ll cover video trends, making content actionable and provide insights on creating effective video content.


Comment

Realtime Shoppable Billboards

Comment

Realtime Shoppable Billboards

Topshop is again using social tools to drive customer awareness of fashion trends and make those trends instantly shoppable. They have continued their democratisation of London Fashion Week with their latest #LiveTrends campaign which brings the catwalk action to billboards across the UK.

Six billboards in London, Leeds, Birmingham, Manchester, Liverpool and Glasgow presented the trends straight from the catwalk. Key trends were highlighted on the Topshop billboards as hashtags. Examples included #checks, #70s or #modernism, which allowed customers to tweet @Topshop and receive a curated online shopping list inspired by the trend. Topshop's eCommerce team had created merchandised looks ahead of time to allow them to respond instantly. All billboards were located within a ten-minute walk of Topshop for those not wanting to get their fashion fix online.

Topshop partnered with digital out of home provider Ocean Outdoor and Twitter for the live stream show, whilst Australian start-up Stackla provided the tools for social curation and aggregation.

The campaign appeared to generate positive results with an average 25% uplift across all featured trend categories (compared to the previous week). In particular, sales of the #moderism featured products were up 75% compared to the prior week.

Live advertising such as this is still in its infancy, but there are strong links with existing customer behaviour. One key takeaway is that customers are now double screening away from home (that is using a mobile or tablet device whilst consuming other media such as TV and now billboards). This will be a media consumption and interaction trend to watch.

See the campaign in action below:

Checkout Topshop's previous Fashion Week social campaigns.


Comment

Cats Are The New Classifieds

Comment

Cats Are The New Classifieds


As first noted by media pundit and journalism professor Jeff Jarvis, it seems that just as classifieds once provided the baseline revenue for print newspapers, cat memes are now providing the eyeballs funding modern news sites.

Printed classified ads of course have since been disintermediated by Craigslist, Gumtree, Realestate.com.au and Carsales. Research indicates that Cragislist alone cost newspapers in the US $5.4 Billion from 2000-2007. This, combined with broader changes in the digital advertising landscape have been linked to increased newspaper subscription prices, decreased display advertising rates and required changes in how newspapers have executed their digital strategies.

The latest estimates suggest that Buzzfeed currently has around 150 million unique visitors per month and is tracking towards $120 Million in annual revenue. Buzzfeed derives three quarters of their traffic from social sites (which requires lots of fresh content to stay at the top of news feeds). They have approximately 200 editorial staff publishing 400 articles per day. Whilst they are well known for their cat memes and 'Top x' articles, they also generate meaningful longform content such as www.buzzfeed.com/bigstories.

So previously, the listing for your garage sale or used car funded investigative journalism and now the advertising revenue from cat memes and native advertising is funding the creation of quality articles.

This trend towards popular content supporting more meaningful work isn't unique to Buzzfeed as highlighted by The Chaser team on their Media Circus program with consumer insights on the most read articles on news.com.au.  See their take on it below:

So is this a new funding model that we should all accept for quality content to be created or is it a sign of the continued decline in quality journalism? 

Time will tell...


Comment